Royal Society of Jewish Welfare - Belgium

 

Established in Antwerp, Belgium, its purpose is to organise, centralise and supervise the private and public welfare initiatives in the city. “The Centrale”, as it is also named, aims to extend material and moral help to the indigent and destitute ones of its society. In fulfilling its task, it does not take into any account the religious and political convictions of those who need its help.

Jewish Community of Vienna (IKG) - Austria

 

Fifteen thousand Jews live in Austria today, with Vienna the home of the great majority. Present-day Austrian Jewry is primarily composed of Holocaust survivors (and their children), returning Austrian expatriates and refugees from eastern Europe. In recent years, Austria has offered sanctuary to many Soviet and Iranian Jews.

CEJI – A Jewish Contribution to an Inclusive Europe - Belgium

 

CEJI stands with people of all backgrounds to promote a Europe of diversity and respect. A Jewish voice at European level, their activities include delivering diversity education, enhancing interfaith and intercultural dialogue, while advocating in the EU against antisemitism and discrimination of all kinds.

Jewish Community of Zagreb - Croatia

 

Despite its small population of approximately 1.500 the Community of Zagreb remains very active. The Community has many things to offer, amongst which are: a kindergarten, a Retirement Home, a holiday resort on the Adriatic coast, , a library and archives, a textile and metals Judaic collection, a Sunday school, a youth club, a "Maccabee" Sports Club, Hebrew language courses, a Cultural Society, a Research and Documentary Centre, and various creative workshops.

Jewish Community of Prague - Czech Republic

 

Numbering around 1.500 registered members today, the Jewish Community of Prague has revived since the fall of Communism in the Czech Republic. The Community has made a big effort to provide their members, regardless of age, a wide range of cultural, educational and sport organizations with several programmes each week. 

Bejt Praha - Czech Republic

 

The Open Prague Jewish Community, offers educational, cultural, religious, and other services for Jews living in and visiting Prague. Bejt Praha welcomes all Jews, whether reform, orthodox or secular.

Jewish Community of Estonia

 

Currently, the Jewish Community in Estonia consists of about 2 000 people. Their umbrella organisation, the Jewish Community in Estonia, has declared that in Estonia there is no official anti-Semitism, and that for Jews Estonia is a safe country and one of the few nations in the world where the Jewish community does not require additional security measures.

Jewish Community of Finland

 

The communities of Helsinki and Turku are members of the Central Council of Jewish Communities in Finland, a consultative body dealing with matters of general interest concerning Jews in Finland. There are 1200 Jews in Helsinki, the capital, and another 200 in Turku.

OSE - France

 

In 1951, OSE was recognized as a “Non-Profit Organization for the Public Good”. Today, it is open to people of all backgrounds and has diversified its missions to accommodate different needs and sectors of society. 

Jewish Community of Athens - Greece

 

There are approximately 3,000 Jews living in Athens, making it currently the largest Community in Greece. Despite its small size, the Coomunity has a very vibrant Jewish life with two operating synagogues, an Elementary School, a Community Center and a Jewish Museum.

Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece

The Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece (KIS) is the umbrella organization of the Greek Jewry. Its aim  is to coordinate the activities and represent the Jewish Communities that function in Greece before the Greek Authorities and foreign Organizations.

Jewish Community of Thessaloniki - Greece

 

 

Federation of Jewish Communities in Kosovo

 

 

Council of Latvian Jewish Communities

 

The Latvian Council of Jewish Communities was founded in 2003 and unifies 13 communities from 9 Latvian cities. Its am is the development of all forms of jewish religious, social and community life, charity and participating in integration processes.

Jewish Community of Lithuania

 

The Lithuanian Jewish Community is the umbrella organization of Lithuanian Jewry. It unites 27 different Jewish organizations and its headquarters in Vilnius, in the building of the prewar Hebrew Tarbut school, is the national meeting place of Jewish people of every age and inclination.

Dutch Jewish Social Services (JMW) - Netherlands

 

 

Union of Religious Communities in Poland (ZGWZ)

 

It is an association formed by Polish Jews in 1949. Based in Warsaw and working with seven administrative branches throughout the country, ZGWŻ consists of approximately 2,000 members congregating in nine municipalities. The Union operates seven active synagogues and 15 prayer houses.

FEDROM - Romania

 

 

Jewish Association of St. Petersburg - Russia

 

 

Federation of Jewish Communities in Serbia

 

The Federation of Jewish Communities of Serbia, is the umbrella organization of Jewish Communities, representing Jews within Serbia and abroad and has the duty of achieving the common objectives of interest to the entire community. The Serbian community has approximately 3,300 members.

The Union of Jewish Communities in Slovakia

 

The Slovak community is the smallest holocaust-surviving community in Europe and today it has less than four thousand people, most of which are of older age. However, many young people have rediscovered their Jewish origins and try to actively contribute to the community. Religious observance is increasing and even some children of mixed marriages are returning to the community and studying Judaism.

Comunitat Jueva Atid de Catalunya - Spain

 

ATID is a reform Jewish community which was born in Barcelona in 1992, to promote Jewish life and its cultural, educational, social and religious values. Its name, which means "future" in Hebrew, was inspired by the Community's commitment of building today their children’s and community’s future.

Jewish Community of Madrid - Spain

 

 

Federation of Jewish Communities in Spain (FCJE)

 

The primary mission of the Federation is to represent the Spanish Judaism before the State and to organizations nationally and internationally.

Beth Shalom - Spain

 

Bet Shalom, the Progressive Jewish Community of Barcelona, is a young, dynamic and welcoming congregation. It is an egalitarian, participative, friendly and supportive community, attentive to its members' needs and committed to the ethical values of Jewish tradition.

VSJF - Switzerland

 

The Association of Swiss Jewish Refugee Aid and Welfare Organisations [VSJF] is the social arm of the SIG. The social welfare office of the VSJF supports Jewish individuals and families in Switzerland that are often not members of a Jewish community. Furthermore, the VSJF supports, complements and advises the social welfare offices of SIG member communities in Switzerland.

Jewish Community in Istanbul - Turkey

 

 

Jewish Care - United Kingdom

 

Jewish Care is the largest provider of health and social care services for the Jewish community of the UK. They are committed to ensuring that members of the Jewish community are able to support and care for one another and they try to inspire British Jews to stay connected to their community by creating and providing excellent social care that enhances their wellbeing. 

© 2016  - ECJC - European Council of Jewish Communities

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